Fly me to the Moon, Baby

The People Who Decide at Stampin’ Up! have decreed that Moon Baby will retire at the end of May. It’s such a sweet set of images and phrases, and it will be one of the special retired sets that makes it into my Permanent Collection.

{My Permanent Collection is growing, and I may have to revisit some of those choices. But not today.}

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Moon Baby Stampin' Blends

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Moon Baby Stampin' Blends

This was an early Brusho experiment for me, and one of the first things I noticed was that I liked the results much better using Watercolor paper. I was able to move the color around more easily and didn’t have to worry about over-working the smooth texture of Whisper White.

Embossing the image made it much easier to “color within the lines”. That’s not a hard and fast rule for me, but it was more appropriate for this image with a small face and hands. It’s amazing how I’ll get myself all whipped up about having to emboss something, and then when I sit down and do it I wonder why I make such a big deal out of it. Embossing gives you lots of bag for not very much buck and it’s a quick technique.

It goes without saying that Wink of Stella was a non-negotiable.

Shop for Moon Baby and all of the rest HERE.

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Creating with Petal Palette and a little Brusho

Brusho intimidated me for a while. Everyone else seemed to be an expert, but I was afraid to begin. I’m happy to report that my fears were unfounded: even a Brusho Novice can get really interesting results:

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Brusho Petal Palette

  • Stamps: Petal Palette
  • Color Palette: Very Vanilla, Elegant Eggplant, Always Artichoke
  • Accessories:  Big Shot, Petals and More Thinlits dies, Brusho, Watercolor Paper, Aquapainter, Layering Oval Framelits, Twine (retired from Holiday 2017), Rhinestone Jewels, Fine Tip Glue Pen

Did you know that the Fine Tip Glue pen works like a gloss coat? I should have let the ink dry a bit longer, but the resulting muddied colors made the roses look more vintage. (That’s my story and I’m standing by it.)

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Brusho Petal Palette

The Green Brusho can separate out into component colors including yellow and purple. This result was completely unexpected, but inspired the color palette that I ended up using. Honestly? I haven’t used either Elegant Eggplant or Always Artichoke in a very long time – years, perhaps!  I was really pleased with the outcome, which goes to show that stretching out of your comfort zone (or the zone of the familiar) is a good thing.

When was the last time you stretched outside your creative routine?

 

 

Brusho and Sheltering Tree

My favorite Stampin’ Partner in Crime escaped her responsibilities earlier this week and came over to create. We were eager to give Brusho a try after seeing what so many others had done. I was a little apprehensive at first, but discovered pretty quickly that the best approach was to dive in headfirst! (If you take this literally, you are going to have an interestingly-colored head. Brusho is intense color.)

I grabbed some watercolor paper and embossed the Sheltering Tree. I sprinkled on some random bits o’ Brusho and unleashed the water spritzer.

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Sheltering Tree Brusho

  • Stamps: Sheltering Tree, Climbing Orchid
  • Color Palette: Very Vanilla, Pear Pizazz, Brusho Brilliant Red, Brusho Gamboge, Brusho Yellow
  • Accessories: Watercolor paper, Copper Embossing Powder, Versamark Ink, Heat Tool, Embossing Buddy, Paper Snips, Stampin’ Dimensionals

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Sheltering Tree Brusho

This version used the Brusho Yellow and Brusho Moss Green, which devolved most interestingly into yellows and purples. It’s a much more subtle look, but it’s more like what we see in the fall here in the islands.

Maui Stamper Stampin' Up! Sheltering Tree Brusho

I used a pretty light hand when I dropped my Brusho Crystals, as I didn’t want dramatic color. You can really see how the individual crystals maintain their character if you don’t add a lot of water. I barely damped my watercolor paper before I added the Brusho, then lightly misted to blend.

There are a lot of great techniques out there and we barely scratched the surface. I’d love to know what you think of this result! I have more “Brusho Bases” – cards with Brusho color and nothing else – so as I am inspired I’ll gladly share. In the meantime, if you like to play, come and play with Brusho!